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查看完整版本 : 兩歲可以掌握到滑雪技巧嗎?


kidkoala
2008-07-03, 13:46
各位好,我係新會員,請多多指教... ^^

我的小兒將會在今年冬季兩歲生日了,不知兩歲可以掌握到滑雪技巧嗎? 有無人有經驗可以告訴我嗎?

Thanks!! :)

ozman
2008-07-03, 14:09
I think two years of age is a bit too early... 3~4 yrs old are good time to start...
Also, I don't think a 2 yr child can sit up on a chairlift by himself....and putting him on lap is not allowed too.

At least the child can ride ski carpet himself and be able to coordinate and control his leg muscles.

mwtse
2008-07-03, 18:18
兩歲年紀太小了,一般四歲年紀會有比較大的機會學懂(即是說就算四歲也不一定可以學識)。
滑雪場天氣變化很大,照顧小朋友不容易的。

宜先帶小朋友學溜冰,習慣了氣溫低的環境,看小朋友是否適應高速移動,以及平衡力是否良好,還有鍛鍊腿部肌肉及協調能力等。

Mike
2008-07-04, 09:13
Generally, in Europe, the ski instructors agree 4 years old is the magic age.

kidkoala
2008-07-04, 18:14
I think two years of age is a bit too early... 3~4 yrs old are good time to start...
Also, I don't think a 2 yr child can sit up on a chairlift by himself....and putting him on lap is not allowed too.

At least the child can ride ski carpet himself and be able to coordinate and control his leg muscles.

hi Ozman,

thanks for your reply. maybe you're right, i think 2 years old is early too, it's just ME that want to push my son to learn that earlier so i'll have him to accompany me =)

oh ski carpet sounds fun too. seems like bring him on my trip and let him play carpet is a good start.

kidkoala
2008-07-04, 18:14
兩歲年紀太小了,一般四歲年紀會有比較大的機會學懂(即是說就算四歲也不一定可以學識)。
滑雪場天氣變化很大,照顧小朋友不容易的。

宜先帶小朋友學溜冰,習慣了氣溫低的環境,看小朋友是否適應高速移動,以及平衡力是否良好,還有鍛鍊腿部肌肉及協調能力等。

hi Mwtse,

學溜冰都是一個好方法,等我留意下最早幾歲可以學先... thanks!

kidkoala
2008-07-04, 18:15
Generally, in Europe, the ski instructors agree 4 years old is the magic age.

thanks Mike!

what do they mean by 'magic age'? is that mean easier to learn the skill by their instinct and braver then adult? do they believe the younger the better? because for me i like ski but i don't ski well because of fearfulness.

Ryann
2008-07-04, 18:27
三歲以上會好少少, 我都曾經教過D三歲幾既小朋友玩SNOWBOARD.

HKS
2008-07-05, 00:14
thanks Mike!

do they believe the younger the better? because for me i like ski but i don't ski well because of fearfulness.


幾歲o既小朋友可以三十幾樓爬落街都唔驚,你得唔得呀?
:D

Rene Cai
2008-07-05, 00:38
thanks Mike!

what do they mean by 'magic age'? is that mean easier to learn the skill by their instinct and braver then adult? do they believe the younger the better? because for me i like ski but i don't ski well because of fearfulness.



"Magic age" which is rental shops at the ski resorts have your child's size for gear renting.

kiki
2008-07-05, 00:50
My friend's daughter starting skiing at 3yrs old. She is now 5yrs, has skiied about 3 times and can already ski down an easy black with me.... Kids pick it up very fast, just need to get a good coach with experience and patience to teach kids.

Mike
2008-07-05, 07:05
thanks Mike!

what do they mean by 'magic age'? is that mean easier to learn the skill by their instinct and braver then adult? do they believe the younger the better? because for me i like ski but i don't ski well because of fearfulness.
In France and Switzerland, kids learn how to ski at the age of 4.
3 years old is a bit too young for the kids to understand and follow. 4 years seems to be the magic age, the ski instructors in Europe all agree 4 to 5 years old is the right age to learn skiing. Of course they all learn on real snow because of their close proximity to the ski slopes. Of course there is always exception. :rolleyes: The following was posted in the old forum:

"I saw the following article which some of you might be interested if you are thinking of taking your kids skiing in Europe or USA next season and planning where to go?

Q. I want to take my young children away skiing with me. Can you suggest any particularly good resorts for small children?

A. The most important consideration is finding a "child friendly" resort. Consider picking a resort that has a short transfer time to resort and easily accessible beginner runs. Choosing accommodation which is close to the slopes makes things easier and means you can nip back to base if you need to. The best choice of accomodation is a family club hotel, chalet, or apartment for a cheaper option. Car free resorts are obviously a safer bet. Some resorts cater for very young children in ski schools or / non-skiing creches. For example, Mayrhofen take children from as young as 2yrs into ski school, and Mammoth and Lenzerheide both take new born babies into kindergarten. Here are some recommended resorts that we believe range from good to excellent for childcare:

Kitzbuhel / Schladming / St Johann in Tirol / Courchevel / Flaine / Megeve / Morzine / Valmorel / Vaujany / Alpe d'Huez / La Plagne / Les Arcs / Wengen / Grindelwald / Arosa / Murren / Are / Geilo / Vail / Copper Mountain / Smugglers Notch / Breckenridge / Beaver Creek / Lake Louise

Skiing with the family: FAQ's
1. What's the youngest age that I can take my child/children on a ski holiday?
This is really a parents own choice, there are no rules. A few resorts, such as Lenzerheide (Switzerland) and Mammoth (U.S.A) take new born babies in their creches. Many others take between 2 - 6 month babies. Research your resort to check the minimum age of children allowed.

2. What age should I start my child/children skiing?
The ESF (Ecole du Ski Francais) recommend that children between 4 and 5 years only ski for a couple of hours a day. This is of course only a recommendation, and a childs parent has the best knowledge of how long they are capable to ski.

3. I don't like the idea of leaving my child/children in the local creche while I'm skiing - is there another option?
There are other options available to you if you don't want to send your child/children to a local creche.
a/. in-house creches, run by qualified nannies from the UK. This can be a very good choice as some offer skiing in the afternoons for the children, dependent on their age and ability. Some tour operators have in-house creches
b/. private nanny, either in resort, through companies such as snowkidz.com, or from the UK, you can hire a nanny for your entire holiday.

4. What type of accommodation should I choose when taking my family skiing?
The best choice of accommodation when skiing with the family and young children, is either a Family Chalet or Family Club Hotel
Some Tour Operators offer accommodation geared up to taking children skiing with you, and these can be a great option; not only on a social level as there are other families with you, but also as all aspects of your holiday are aimed to help your children have more fun on holiday, and to make sure parents relax and enjoy a family holiday without stress.

5. Should my child/children wear helmets when skiing?
This is a very personal choice. However, many ski schools insist that children wear helmets during lessons. In Italy, as well as many resorts in America, children must wear helmets on the slopes at all times."

http://220.232.208.148:8080/viewtopic.php?t=6732&highlight=kid&sid=98f9ecd2682ee73bd2d45e1a11bc4032

http://220.232.208.148:8080/viewtopic.php?t=5679&highlight=kid&sid=98f9ecd2682ee73bd2d45e1a11bc4032

kidkoala
2008-07-07, 11:40
三歲以上會好少少, 我都曾經教過D三歲幾既小朋友玩SNOWBOARD.

hi Ryan,

係呀,三歲打後開始都好,三歲左右比佢玩定溜冰同雪兜先...

kidkoala
2008-07-07, 11:42
幾歲o既小朋友可以三十幾樓爬落街都唔驚,你得唔得呀?
:D

hi HKS,

呢個係真架,越細個越大膽,我自己就克服唔到咁高,之前去滑雪團有個小朋友三歲,day one 喺教練教導下以經玩到 beginner slope, day two 已經見佢 daddy mami 帶佢玩中級,小朋友真係玩得好勇! d 根骨柔軟,跌到就起返身,唔似我初初玩,跌到起地仲要 mor 一大論先起到身... :o

kidkoala
2008-07-07, 11:42
"Magic age" which is rental shops at the ski resorts have your child's size for gear renting.

yes, that's very true!

kidkoala
2008-07-07, 11:44
My friend's daughter starting skiing at 3yrs old. She is now 5yrs, has skiied about 3 times and can already ski down an easy black with me.... Kids pick it up very fast, just need to get a good coach with experience and patience to teach kids.

yes i agree! so where the girl started learning that? in some sort of resort that there're coaches to teach a bunch of kids? or private one?

kidkoala
2008-07-07, 11:46
In France and Switzerland, kids learn how to ski at the age of 4.
3 years old is a bit too young for the kids to understand and follow. 4 years seems to be the magic age, the ski instructors in Europe all agree 4 to 5 years old is the right age to learn skiing. Of course they all learn on real snow because of their close proximity to the ski slopes. Of course there is always exception. :rolleyes: The following was posted in the old forum:

"I saw the following article which some of you might be interested if you are thinking of taking your kids skiing in Europe or USA next season and planning where to go?

Q. I want to take my young children away skiing with me. Can you suggest any particularly good resorts for small children?

A. The most important consideration is finding a "child friendly" resort. Consider picking a resort that has a short transfer time to resort and easily accessible beginner runs. Choosing accommodation which is close to the slopes makes things easier and means you can nip back to base if you need to. The best choice of accomodation is a family club hotel, chalet, or apartment for a cheaper option. Car free resorts are obviously a safer bet. Some resorts cater for very young children in ski schools or / non-skiing creches. For example, Mayrhofen take children from as young as 2yrs into ski school, and Mammoth and Lenzerheide both take new born babies into kindergarten. Here are some recommended resorts that we believe range from good to excellent for childcare:

Kitzbuhel / Schladming / St Johann in Tirol / Courchevel / Flaine / Megeve / Morzine / Valmorel / Vaujany / Alpe d'Huez / La Plagne / Les Arcs / Wengen / Grindelwald / Arosa / Murren / Are / Geilo / Vail / Copper Mountain / Smugglers Notch / Breckenridge / Beaver Creek / Lake Louise

Skiing with the family: FAQ's
1. What's the youngest age that I can take my child/children on a ski holiday?
This is really a parents own choice, there are no rules. A few resorts, such as Lenzerheide (Switzerland) and Mammoth (U.S.A) take new born babies in their creches. Many others take between 2 - 6 month babies. Research your resort to check the minimum age of children allowed.

2. What age should I start my child/children skiing?
The ESF (Ecole du Ski Francais) recommend that children between 4 and 5 years only ski for a couple of hours a day. This is of course only a recommendation, and a childs parent has the best knowledge of how long they are capable to ski.

3. I don't like the idea of leaving my child/children in the local creche while I'm skiing - is there another option?
There are other options available to you if you don't want to send your child/children to a local creche.
a/. in-house creches, run by qualified nannies from the UK. This can be a very good choice as some offer skiing in the afternoons for the children, dependent on their age and ability. Some tour operators have in-house creches
b/. private nanny, either in resort, through companies such as snowkidz.com, or from the UK, you can hire a nanny for your entire holiday.

4. What type of accommodation should I choose when taking my family skiing?
The best choice of accommodation when skiing with the family and young children, is either a Family Chalet or Family Club Hotel
Some Tour Operators offer accommodation geared up to taking children skiing with you, and these can be a great option; not only on a social level as there are other families with you, but also as all aspects of your holiday are aimed to help your children have more fun on holiday, and to make sure parents relax and enjoy a family holiday without stress.

5. Should my child/children wear helmets when skiing?
This is a very personal choice. However, many ski schools insist that children wear helmets during lessons. In Italy, as well as many resorts in America, children must wear helmets on the slopes at all times."

http://220.232.208.148:8080/viewtopic.php?t=6732&highlight=kid&sid=98f9ecd2682ee73bd2d45e1a11bc4032

http://220.232.208.148:8080/viewtopic.php?t=5679&highlight=kid&sid=98f9ecd2682ee73bd2d45e1a11bc4032

Hi Mike,

THANK YOU SO SO MUCH! You're star! This is the EXACT info what i want and a great reference for my searching!

Let me look in the recommended resorts part which are really helpful for me.

kiki
2008-07-08, 16:19
yes i agree! so where the girl started learning that? in some sort of resort that there're coaches to teach a bunch of kids? or private one?

My friend's daughter skied in Japan including Niseko, Naeba, Rusutsu etc. Each time, my friend hired a private coach for her for about 2hrs a day. The rest of the day, the little girl just followed us to practice, initially on easy runs but they learn very fast. Last time I went to Club Med in Italy, there were plenty of group classes for little kids, some as small as 2yrs old. The group classes run for a whole day, including providing lunch and giving the kids tea breaks in between. If you prefer group classes, can try Club Med in Sohoro, Hokkaido. Club Med prices include all lessons and meals so a good deal. But depends if your kid is shy and willing to follow a group of strangers, otherwise a private tutor will be better as the parents can hang around.

A.T.
2008-07-22, 17:59
各位好,我係新會員,請多多指教... ^^

我的小兒將會在今年冬季兩歲生日了,不知兩歲可以掌握到滑雪技巧嗎? 有無人有經驗可以告訴我嗎?

Thanks!! :)

My daughter started playing roller blade at 2+ and learned skiing for few lessons at slope 8 at 3. We bring her to Neaba that year but the snow/wind was so strong. For such a small kid travelling cold place for the first time, I thought she definitely not enjoying the weather and took her few days to adjust (She even suffered from high fever there). Besides, we can't enrol lesson for her as the school only accepted children at 5. For this trip, she only play some snow games in Neaba but didn't ski (hence I cannot ski as well). She enjoyed Disney so much.

For the second time, we enrol 5-day ski course in Whistler for her. She was 4 years old and could pick up some skiing skill there.

For the third time, she skiied a few lessons at slope 8 with two children before the trip. She enjoyed the lessons there. Then, she skiied with us in Whistler for nine days. She enjoyed skiing with steady progress. She can ski blue run there.

I have a small daughter who is almost 3 now. As my elder one is learning ice-skating, I plan to start ice-skating for the smaller one last week. Yet, the staff of ice-skating rink strongly suggested that she should learn after 3 as the skating shoe is so heavy and it is not good for her feet development. Hence, my plan is forced to be postphoned.

From my experience and impression, I believed that child could learn skiing at aged 3. But if my holiday is short and it's my only ski trip in the year, I won't take the risk to bring kid under 3 years old again.

Actually, I plan not to bring two of them in coming ski season as the elder one would be studying P.1 which is impossible to take leave for such holiday while the younger one is still too small. I long for my family ski trip in next year.

Cheers.:)

AC2000
2012-06-20, 06:38
4 yr old kids teach how to skid very steep slopes...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkYqNKhj5AM&feature=related

Mike
2014-06-01, 07:52
Here below is a recent article on this subject - "How soon can my children start to ski?"

In a bid to find the definitive answer "Welove2ski" consulted some of the experts (and one of our own editors who just likes talking a lot).

Pierre de Monvallier, Oxygene ski school
There isn’t a straightforward answer. Generally, if they want to start in a proper group, between four and five seems to be the right age. If they are younger, it is better if they do a private session or semi-private, with two or three in a class. It is difficult to cope with more than a couple of three-year-olds at a time.
However, it all depends on the child. Usually in any class of children of the same age, you’ll find five who really enjoy it, and a sixth one who hates it. It might be because he gets frustrated quickly whenever he’s learning something new, or because his boots are not comfy, or because he is cold. There are so many reasons why children take to skiing, and many reasons why they don’t! One final word – the age at which children start makes very little difference to how well they ski as adults. Whether or not they enjoyed their first experience is far more important!”

Lisa Dance, Family Ski Company in Roberty, Ardent & Les Coches
For most children, four to six is the best age to start. Once they’ve gone to school they are much better able to understand instructions and of course they’re physically more able, too.
Just don’t assume they’re going to take to it automatically. My daughter was able to ride a horse at a rising trot when she was four and a half. But it was another year before she started to enjoy skiing! That’s why the Family Ski Company provides a Ski School Helper to accompany our three, four and five year old skiers each day in ski school – to check on their progress and cheer them along when they have their breakthroughs.
Of course, a good mental attitude helps. So my advice is that whenever parents talk about skiing in front of their children they should always be positive and enthusiastic about it. If one of them is scared of skiing, and shows it, then it’s more likely the child will be too.

Tom Saxlund, New Generation
It really depends on the age of the child. As soon as they can walk they can start playing on plastic skis at home. The skis don’t have metal edges, so they won’t hurt themselves. I like to think of it as though they are trying on Daddy’s slippers or Mummy’s heels. The plastic skis are an extension to that.
On the snow our group lessons start at age 4, and private lessons can be from 2½ to 3 years, depending on the child and their individual development. The lesson should be short, and focus on fun.
One of the key things for us that parents learn the best way to support their kids as they learn to ski outside ski lessons. That way, your child will learn how to balance on their own from the start. Get it wrong (holding them between your legs) and it’s like skiing around with a sack of potatoes. If you’re not sure, ask an expert or have a private ski lesson as a family.

Chris Thompson, Ski Famille
Most children enjoy having a play on skis with Mum and Dad from two or three but it’s a rare child who is ready for more formal instruction until they are four. Once they have started school back home, they are generally used to being in groups and having someone they don’t know telling them what to do!
We have introduced our own ski taster sessions for three and four year olds in Les Gets this winter; they’re made up of four separate hour-long sessions across the week in small groups with childcare support. We trialed it last season on a few weeks and it proved a great way of gently introducing children to the snow without risking putting them off.

John Yates-Smith, YSE in Val d'isere
Having watched multicoloured snakes of tiny children on the ski slopes, many parents are desperate to take their own offspring skiing. They have this idea of what fun it would be to glide elegantly en famille down the blue runs, their grateful children glowing with health and grinning from ear to ear…
It can happen like that, and when it does there’s nothing better: but there’s a lot of work along the way before you arrive at that stage.
Children can start to ski a little at two, if they are confident, co-ordinated and relatively fearless. Little boys seem to take to it earlier than girls, perhaps because they don’t have the intelligence to imagine how much careering into a tree will sting! But you need good weather, good snow, a very gentle nursery slope and lots of time and patience, one to one. They can manage about an hour per day, probably at lunchtime, when the weather is warmer and the slopes at their emptiest…
From as young as their third birthday, children can learn to go up the drag-lift and ski back down in gorgeous little parallel turns, though still only for about an hour per day. A parent can help with the initial stages, such as getting used to the drag-lift. You put one of your skis between the child’s, put the drag between your own legs, and push the child along with your leg. But most parents are survival skiers, getting down the piste in spite of their technique, not because of it. Children learn largely through imitation, and they need someone technically perfect to copy.
If you can get an instructor from your own country, it makes life a lot easier. Children find even practically bilingual foreigners very confusing. We met a Londoner furious his child had been criticised for not using his aitches properly. It took a while to work out that the teacher meant edges.”

Sean Newsom, Welove2ski
At what age should a child start to ski? Well, it all depends on the context. I meet a lot of sons and daughters of ski instructors who were on skis almost as soon as they could walk. Obviously, their parents were keen for them to start early. But I think what really mattered was the fact that they lived in the mountains, grew up in the midst of skiing culture, and saw people going out onto the slopes every day. It seemed natural to them: like getting on a bus is for a child in London.
But if the pistes are a brand-new environment, then it’s another matter altogether. Most young children can’t see the point of what they’re doing, don’t like wearing ski boots, and hate being left by Mum or Dad with a bunch of complete strangers. Utter misery is the end product: and it’s going to suck the joy out of your own holiday to see them so unhappy. So save yourself the heartache, and the money, by waiting until they’re settled in Reception or Year One back home, before you put them into ski school.
My own son’s experiences seem pretty typical. Aged two and three, he didn’t mind an hour or so of sliding on a very flat slope with Mummy or Daddy (and preferably both). But what he really enjoyed was zooming about on a bum board or a toboggan, riding on the bubble lifts, and playing with us in the swimming pool.
At three years and nine months, he hated his first experience of ski school. We took him out after a couple of days.
But on the next holiday, when he was nearly five, everything changed. The fact that there were slightly older kids in his chalet made a difference. They were self-evidently cool and he immediately wanted to be part of their gang and do what they were doing. That got him into school without any tears, and once he was there he discovered he was actually pretty good at skiing. A year later, he was loving it, and now is begging to go back. (Though he says the best bit was the final morning when he skied with us.)
Of course you can happily leave it for several years beyond that. But Gerhard Told, who’s been teaching children to ski for nearly forty years in the Skiwelt reckons that once they get to nine or ten they don’t learn so quickly or completely. “It’s got something to do with the feeling of skiing,” he says. “It doesn’t become second nature to them in the way it does with the younger kids.”
By the way, if you want your child to become a ski racer, “You can’t really start them soon enough,” says Told. “It has to be second nature to them, almost like walking.” Moving to the Alps will probably help, too…

happy_mum
2014-06-15, 19:48
I personally would not attempt to send a child for ski lesson if the child is under 3 years old. You have to consider the physical ability of any children under 3 years old or even if they are over 3 years old.

jameslai2028
2014-06-26, 20:01
鬼仔就可能得⋯⋯ FYI,我個女4歲尾到5歲先玩(我個女係比較細粒)

camelliayiu
2014-08-17, 12:17
想問如果新年去滑雪,去 邊到滑雪好??

camelliayiu
2014-08-17, 12:23
韓國去左三次龍平,今年唔係好想去韓國:doh:

boyie
2014-11-18, 15:29
會唔會太細個?